Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Our Recent Field Trip

This is one we take several times every year. The grandparents often can use help on their goat farm, about a four hour drive away. It's a "five" if you include the frequent u-turns back home within the first 10 minutes for forgotten items. Of course this time, I remembered not packing the camera after mile 25-- too far along to retrieve, so you will hafta use your imagination when prompted. I'm not worried. You're a creative bunch...


The Journey

It begins with piling into a cute little Mazda 5. Fun, because it has three rows of seating but still zippy. We pack two grown-ups in the front-- stands to reason-- two kids, in the not-so-far back-- they love it-- and all the loot in-between. A pair of poodles roam, one settling down at the adult passenger's floorboard, and the other changing laps and shoulders. He's our pup, and we think he has ADHD. (Imagine, if you will, a picture of a cream-colored miniature poodle with short hair and an Einstein mop and mustache on his face. Cute dog. Not real smart, though.)

It's rather ordinary the first half of the drive, a giant racetrack and municipal airport serve as the only interesting scenes. But around Thurber/Mingus, it get's interesting. The tiny town has an enormous smoke stack on the north, left over from something, and an intriguing castle on a hill to the south. Then, we get into the top part of hill country and quite scenic part of the trip. (Can you picture Hogwarts with dragons circling above? It's nothing like that. More of a towerless sand castle-shaped restaurant. Still cool though.)

Right off the bat we can see a wind farm with two dozen turbines towering over 400 feet each. (Unbelievable, even if I did photograph it.) For the following hour and a half we pass alongside a steady view of small hills, a few small towns and we're there at the farm.


Like I said, We're There

Upon immediate arrival, the kids have the unique pleasure of experiencing the miracle of goat birth. More disgusting than awe-inspiring to watch in real life, though. That made for 30 new Boers and 10 new milk goats this go-round. Plus another 20, mostly Alpines and Saanens, are on the way. We were there primarily to help with the additional feeding and milking, and we needed to move some pens around. 

Of course the wind made things a real challenge. It was straight outta the Wizard of Oz, I even thought I saw someone pedaling a bike in mid-air. Conditions like that really sap the enengy, but we knew we could count on a hardy meal when we were done. (Imagine Thanksgiving, every day; drumstick in one hand, corncob the other...)

The next morning we got up for more of the same, only less wind. Whew! Sat down for another big spread. This one, a heaping of eggs, hashbrowns, pancakes, deer sausage, biscuits and gravy. Sure we were all glad to help, but it's this meal that always makes the work worth while. Thankfully, we packed up before it, too, because we could hardly budge from having such full tummies. (Pictured here are a couple giant beachballs, and their dogs.) We then waddle to the car, stuff ourselves inside and return home.

And even though the field was covered in goat poo, we look forward to another trip back. (Visualize a typical family of four, wearing dirty boots and smiles. Then thank God that mental pictures have no odors...)

9 comments:

Kris said...

Sounds like an awesome field trip! How cool to see the goat birth. I remember the first time I saw a cow give birth. I was all about the miracle of birth until I was introduced to placenta. Ewww!

Nekey said...

Sounds like a great trip to me!
:0)

Kris said...

I left you a stack of awards on my blog today. :-)

Nikowa@KHA said...

Yep glad those mental pictures are odorless...especially the goat births :)

BUT on the other hand, those food smells would be GREAT! :)

sgaissert said...

Sounds great! My daughter and I recently drove in upstate New York and were simply awed by the wind farms. So majestic and well,positive! Unfortunately, no goat births occurred. Maybe next field trip . . .

Kat said...

Great imagery...I could picture it all except the Hogwarts part (just kidding). I was with my daughter on a field trip to a farm once and while we only live maybe 3 miles from the 'country' it was hilarious because all the kids were definitely 'city slickers'. The cow had recently given birth and the placenta was out--talk about excitement! Thanks for the trip.

Such Lovely Freckles said...

Well, in my case mental pictures do have odors. But then, I'm a nut. This sounds like a fantastic field trip, and I'm hoping to go on one with my kids soon. I grew up in a small town with two farms nearby. I'd go there to buy fresh milk, which meant I had to walk through the barn past all the cows. I always stopped to pet the calves. On the way out I'd stop to feed the chickens. My kids, while growing up in a suburb don't ever get this experience.

Jena said...

I like all the imagery, especially the wind. We lived in Texas a couple years, and I can feel it still. Thanks for joining in on our Virtual Field Trip!

sgaissert said...

Where are you, Mister Dad? Imiss you.